Oasis: Be Here Now (Remastered Deluxe Edition)

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Once upon a time two brothers, Liam and Noel Gallagher, ruled the world with their legendary rock band Oasis. The brothers Gallagher, along with their merry cohorts, crash landed upon American shores in the mid-1990s with their landmark debut album Definitely Maybe. Born with a voracious lust for life and overconfident pomposity, Liam and Noel could have easily been mistaken for the real life versions of Beavis and Butthead. After all, the feuding siblings’ humorous witticisms and pointless banter actually landed on the charts with their infamous interview recording “Wibbling Rivalry.”

After successfully conquering the United States with their anthemic Britpop hits “Live Forever,” “Wonderwall” and “Champagne Supernova,” the Gallagher brothers seemed determined to record an album which sounded as gargantuan as their enormous egos. Late in the summer of 1997, Oasis unleashed their keenly awaited follow-up the multi-platinum (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? Initial reactions seemed to indicate fans were ‘mad fer it’ as the group’s third album, Be Here Now was quickly consumed by the public, selling in excess of 350,000 copies on its first day of release. Despite its initial warm reception, Be Here Now is historically remembered as the beginning of the end of Oasis’ worldwide reign. Although touted by many as “the last, great Oasis album,” Be Here Now is full of infectious hooks, sing-a-long choruses, and big, sloppy guitar riffs, all of which beautifully demonstrate the band’s florid illusions of world domination.

While certainly not Noel Gallagher’s strongest effort lyrically, Oasis’ third album more than aptly says what it says very melodically. Despite its shortcomings, the album triumphs as an over-the-top cataclysmic summation of the visceral bravado projected by Liam and Noel. It proudly revels in its arrogant bombast, while concurrently being excessive, brash, nonsensical and semi-psychedelic, all of which are the exact reasons it is equally loved and loathed. While overly long and dripping with delusional grandeur, it’s 71 minutes is flooded with fist pumping anthems and catchy hooks custom made to fill a stadium. From its massive opener “D’You Know What I Mean,” to the exceedingly tuneful “Stand by Me,” Be Here Now doggedly beguiles by combining nearly symphonic melodies (“Don’t Go Away”) with an intense electric guitar crunchiness (“My Big Mouth”). Each of the album’s magnanimous tracks seethe with a seriously intense insincerity, which continues to be recalled as a distinguishing component within Oasis’ everlasting legacy. And don’t bother trying to deny the irrepressible smile that creeps across your face during the 9-minute opus “All Around the World” as you wickedly imagine Noel insisting the track was to be needlessly extended just to torment Liam during the recording process.

The newly remastered three-disc deluxe edition of Be Here Now makes it worthwhile to revisit this historically divisive album, as it includes the much sought after Mustique demos. Over the years, these mythic recordings have reached legendary status amongst throngs of Oasis fanatics. Also included are the era’s B-sides, and several rarities including a cover of the Beatles’ “Help! (Live in L.A.).” This set is beautifully housed within a case bound book with rare photos and extensive liner notes. A super deluxe limited edition will be released in November, which will include the album on double heavyweight vinyl, an exclusive 7-inch of early demo versions of “Stand by Me” and “Going Nowhere,” the Mustique Demo white label LP, a promo only CD of “D’You Know What I Mean? (NG’s 2016 Rethink),” a 52-page coffee table book, embossed key ring, and a set of four postcards.

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Watch Noel Gallagher discuss the making of Be Here Now below:

 

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