Vinyl Rewind Redux

As subscribers of my music blog may remember, I featured Vinyl Rewind in a Q&A piece a couple of years ago. However, with the continued resurgence of vinyl, I recently reached out to the Vinyl Geek for a second time and again he was gracious enough to answer a few additional questions.

With the contemporary renaissance of vinyl record collecting, now is the perfect time to dive into Vinyl Rewind. Not only has renewed interest in the vinyl record format become more popular since the 1980s, but interest has also made the internet ubiquitous with numerous music blogs and websites discussing the enduring format. Among the most noteworthy and enjoyable I’ve found is Vinyl Rewind, which is hosted by wax enthusiast Eric Callero, aka the Vinyl Geek.

The Vinyl Geek shares his insight of his latest groove-a-licious finds in an extremely entertaining and informative style. I always learn fascinating tidbits about albums I’ve enjoyed for years (most notably, his in-depth analysis of The Beatles and Prince’s Sign o’ the Times double albums), as well as find new items to add to my wish list each time he uploads a new video. So, if you treasure collecting favorite old and new albums on this long beloved format as much as I do, then I highly recommend checking out the Vinyl Rewind website and subscribing to the Vinyl Geek’s YouTube channel.

After habitually visiting his YouTube channel for longer than I can now recall, I’d amassed a handful of questions which the Vinyl Geek was kind enough to take the time to answer for me. His insights were both interesting and beneficial, so I thought I’d share his responses with fellow crate diggers who not only appreciate vinyl, but are always seeking a gratifyingly successful new haul. [Click here to read my Q&A with the Vinyl Geek]

Prince: Purple Rain (Deluxe Expanded Edition)

In 1984, Prince became a household name when his popularity soared into the stratosphere upon the release of his film debut and its accompanying soundtrack Purple Rain. Eventually selling over 25 million copies to date, Prince’s sixth studio album concurrently served as a full-length release of new material as well as underscored his dramatic first appearance upon the silver screen.

Prince fans and the mainstream masses alike know the classic hits spawned from The Purple One’s seminal release by heart: “Let’s Go Crazy,” “When Doves Cry” and the epochal title track, all of which became staples of radio, MTV and Prince’s live repertoire. Now, 33 years later, we have reason to rejoice and revisit this stunning work of genius anew with the release of the Purple Rain Deluxe Expanded edition… [Read Full Review]

The Age of Television Variety Shows, Panapets and Record Clubs

My third and final chapter of Memories of Old and AM Gold focuses on musical television shows, transistor radios, and mail order record clubs…

Often reflecting back upon the days when AM radio ruled the airwaves with infectious bubblegum earworms and Casey Kasem’s weekly American Top 40 countdown, I remember prime time television also provided a moderate source of musical entertainment with series such as The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, Tony Orlando and Dawn, Donny & Marie, and The Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis, Jr. Show. Additionally, late night programming provided the rock-oriented Midnight Special and Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert for the hard-core music enthusiasts who were dedicated to stay up past midnight.

I remember eagerly waking up on Saturdays, bleary-eyed after my late-night concert viewing sessions, eager to seek out selected musical programming. I’d tune into American Bandstand, Solid Gold, the Grand Ole Opry Live, and Dolly, which starred Dolly Parton. [Read Full Feature] or [Read Part One] and [Read Part Two]

Long-lost days of musical Saturday morning cartoons and bedroom slide show concerts

As a child during the late 1960s and 1970s, the magical world of music caught my attention immediately, but outlets to find musical sources were extremely limited. My ears were always thirsting to hear something new, thus I would gravitate towards any form of media that related to my affinity for music. One year for Christmas I’d asked Santa Claus to bring me Kenner’s Give-A-Show Projector, and to my delight, he happily obliged. I’d lie in my bed every night and project some of my favorite cartoon character’s images upon my bedroom wall and ceiling. I’d stay up well past my bedtime (unbeknownst to my parents) and produce my own private slide shows and concerts starring The Archies, Josie and the Pussycats, H.R. Pufnstuf and The Scooby-Doo Show.

Weekend nights were usually spent watching The Partridge Family, The Monkees, and The Brady Bunch. I’d also excitedly arise early every Saturday morning and record all the songs from each week’s episode of my favorite cartoon/musical shows including H.R. Pufnstuf and The Krofft Supershow. My childhood Saturday mornings revolved around the world of Sid & Marty Krofft. [Read Full Feature] and [Read Part One]

The Golden Days of AM Radio and Cereal Box Records

Whenever summer rolls around, it annually evokes fond memories of youthful days I’d eagerly spend counting down until the school year would finally end. The anticipation of long, lazy summer days, extended car rides, and family vacations was always palpable. That was the era of AM radio hits which often turned into road trip sing-alongs which served as a much needed reprieve from being cooped up for hours on end in the car. I’m referring to a time when portable electronics were almost non-existent and the only access to music was the standard AM radio that came factory installed in the family owned American automobile.

Summertime also reminds me of how excited I’d get about routine trips to the grocery store when I was a kid. Yes, the grocery store, because back in those days, they used to print records right on the backs of cereal boxes, similar to flexi discs often found in music publications or instructional books. Nothing made me happier than picking out a brand of cereal I’d pretend to like just so I could get a new record by The Archies, The Monkees, or The Jackson 5. I can still recall being mesmerized and oddly entertained as I’d watch the phonograph stylus play over the faces of Betty, Veronica, Archie, Reggie, Jughead, and Hot Dog as I carefully memorized every word of “Everything’s Archie” and “Nursery Rhyme.” [Read Full Feature]

Why Every Beatles Fan Needs Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band: Super Deluxe Edition

It was 50 years ago today when the Beatles unleashed what would become the band’s seminal masterpiece, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The album was a sonic work of art in 1967, forever changing the landscape of what could be achieved in the recording studio. It’s hard to imagine now, but back then, no one had heard anything remotely close to the conceptual revelation that was encapsulated on the fab four’s eighth studio effort.

Now, there’s an entirely new reason to revisit and marvel at the historic wonders of Sgt. Pepper, as a new super deluxe edition box set has been released to coincide with its original release day (May 26th), to commemorate the album’s 50th anniversary. Giles Martin (late producer George Martin’s son) has created a new up-to-date remix, not just another remaster, but a completely remixed version from the original tape masters.

Similar to 1999’s Yellow Submarine Songtrack, the new Sgt. Pepper mix is well balanced, leaving plenty of headroom for the lead vocals to breathe, which are now appropriately up front and center. It’s literally as if you’re hearing this beloved masterwork in stereo for the very first time, highlighting a noticeable wealth of previously buried minute details. The 5.1 surround mix on the box set’s Blu-ray literally brings the album to life in such a way, you literally feel as if you’re standing inside the studio while the Beatles are recording. [Read Full Review]

 

Remembering Donna Summer (December 31, 1948 – May 17, 2012)

Donna Summer 1948 – 2012

I find it hard to believe the five-year anniversary of Donna Summer’s passing is already upon us. Ever since she shockingly succumbed to cancer in 2012, I’ve honored her memory often by revisiting her incredible body of work. I’ve tried to celebrate her spirit by listening to her music and keeping her memory alive, especially on the anniversary of her death.

There’s no denying the fact that Donna Summer knew how to create a dance record. Her magnificent 17-minute non-stop epic “MacArthur Park Suite” (which took up an entire side of her Live and More double album), weaved Jimmy Webb’s unforgettable melody and poetic lyrics around two of Summer’s best original songs (“One of A Kind” and “Heaven Knows”), creating a magical musical opus which I’ve never managed to grow tired of hearing or erase from my memory since its release in 1978. This was followed by Summer’s next masterpiece, the epochal Bad Girls, which deservedly became the best-selling album of her career. Packed with rock-tinged greatest hits “Hot Stuff” and “Dim All the Lights,” as well as the vivacious title track, this four-sided oeuvre also included gorgeous ballads along with the blistering electronic club hits “Our Love,” “Lucky” and “Sunset People.”

Donna Summer’s voice and music inscribed an indelible mark on me, for which I will be eternally grateful. She may have left us all too soon, but her musical legacy will live on eternally. So, let’s dance in memory of Donna Summer, and always keep her among our most cherished memories. [Read Full Tribute]