Re-experiencing the Beatles’ U.S. Albums

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ landmark Abbey Road album, and as a way to placate my fixated anxiousness for the release of its super deluxe edition and picture disc, I’ve decided to dust off my box set of the Beatles’ U.S. albums. I’m rediscovering and revisiting each individual album in chronological sequence as I await to revel within the newly remixed Abbey Road in all its glory on the golden anniversary of the historic release date. In the meantime…

I wasn’t born when the Beatles first arrived in America, but that didn’t stop me from liberating their albums from my eldest sister and memorizing every word, harmony and riff until I could hear them in my sleep, and repeatedly dream of the Capitol Records’ label with its dome logo and colorband ring spinning in my head. However, I’ll shamefacedly admit that during my early adulthood I thought I’d outgrown the mop topped Fab Four and briefly pushed them aside as I sought to forge my own musical identity. But an eager audiophile soon set me back onto the right track. With the Beatles’ 13-disc box set The U.S. Albums, I’m able to habitually seize the opportunity to turn back time and experience a taste of Beatlemania for myself.

The U.S. albums (notorious for their equalized echo chamber sound, or duophonic simulated stereo, and arbitrarily sequenced track lists), reportedly annoyed the band members, which is believed to be the inspiration behind the infamous “Butcher’s Block” cover (featuring the band holding disjointed baby dolls and raw meat while sporting white lab coats) for the U.S. only release Yesterday and Today. However, these are not the versions included here, but instead merely duplicated track sequencing sourced from an amalgamation of the original 1960s masters and the 2009 remasters. This box set, alongside the deluxe remixed editions of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, The Beatles, and the anniversary remix edition of Abbey Road, are requisite additions to any Beatles completist’s collection. [Read full feature]

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10 Songs I Never Want to Hear Again

The following list of songs represents what I consider to be prime examples of the antithesis of a timeless classic. I don’t intentionally mean to disparage any of these artists or their work, these are merely my honest knee-jerk reactions triggered whenever I hear these particular songs. Music is very subjective, therefore; I realize these are only my opinions, which should be taken with a grain of salt and are not any more or less valid than anyone else’s. I’ve compiled this list primarily for my own entertainment and amusement.

The artists included on the list are some of my favorites as well as some which are not, but I’ll leave that for you decipher which ones are which.

10) Peter Cetera: “Glory of Love”

  9) All-4-One: “I Swear”

  8) Toni Braxton: “Un-break My Heart”

  7) Anita Baker: “Sweet Love”

  6) Madonna: “Material Girl”

  5) Lee Greenwood: “God Bless the USA”

  4) Whitney Houston: “The Greatest Love of All”

  3) Bob Carlisle: “Butterfly Kisses”

  2) Taylor Swift “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together”

  1) Matthew Wilder: “Break My Stride”

To read my explanations why I chose each selection on my list, please click here